The Intelligent Workplace

The Intelligent Workplace

Episode 41

How to land a job that hasn’t been created yet.

​Christopher Bishop
Chief Reinvention Officer
Improvising Careers​​

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On this episode of the Intelligent Workplace we look into the future to discuss the idea of succeeding at a job that doesn’t yet exist. What will jobs look like? How can the current and future workforce be better prepared to succeed in those roles.
 
Leading the conversation is is Christopher Bishop, Chief Reinvention Officer at Improvising Careers. He describes himself as a is a nonlinear, multimodal careerist who has had eight careers so far! He is a TEDx speaker, ex-IBMer, former studio musician, future workplace consultant, and a firm believer in the power of focusing on the fringe.
 
Christopher believes the todays learners will operate in a global borderless workplace. Their careers will be in emerging technologies, such as AI ethics, genomic editing and robotics. In this episode he shares his thoughts on this and much more, including breaking into song!
 
Sit back, relax and enjoy the ride, this episode is a lot of fun.
 
Episode Links
Christopher’s LinkedIn Learning course – “Future proofing your data science career

Listen to the episode

Chris Lukianenk…:

Hi, I’m Chris Lukianenko, and this is the Intelligent Workplace brought to you by LiveTiles, my chance to speak with the industry experts and explore the new ideas and technologies that are shaping and transforming the modern workplace.

 

 

 

 

[00:00:30]

 

 

 

 

[00:01:00]

Life has changed a lot recently with so many of us working remotely. It’s really difficult to keep those old school workplace connections intact. Connection and engagement with staff is so important for happy, productive workers, but how do you stay in touch remotely? Introducing LiveTiles Vibe, a rapid employee pulse check that makes employees feel cared for and gives leaders the insights they need to enact change. Vibes are simple interactive cards that are emailed to employees and can be completed in just seconds. Shorter than a survey, faster than a meeting, and more fun than a text. Developed with workplace psychology experts, LiveTiles Vibe is the quickest way to get a team-wide pulse check. Whether you’re working from home or back in the office, with LiveTiles Vibe, you’re only one click away from knowing how the team is feeling. For more information on LiveTiles Vibe, click the link in the show notes.

 

 

 

 

[00:01:30]

On this episode of the Intelligent Workplace, we’re going to take a look into the future and discuss the idea of succeeding at a job that doesn’t yet exist. What will this job be? How could we better prepare for the current and future workforce to succeed in them? Joining me in this conversation is Christopher Bishop who describes himself as a nonlinear multimodal careerist, who’s had eight careers so far. His current title is chief reinvention officer. Exactly what that is, I’m sure we’ll find out. But in the past, he has been everything from a touring professional musician to a strategic consultant during a 15-year career at IBM. So, sit back, relax, open your mind. This one could go anywhere. Welcome to the Intelligent Workplace podcast, Christopher Bishop.

 

[00:02:00]

Christopher Bis…:

 

Well, thank you, Chris. It’s great to be here and thank you for the opportunity to share my perspective with your listeners.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Absolute pleasure. And you and I could probably not be further apart with you in Connecticut and me down here in Hobart, Tasmania.

 

Christopher Bis…:

Yes. It’s kind of gray and rainy up here as winter starts to set in, in the woodburbs outside New York City.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

 

 

[00:02:30]

Ah, it’s a beautiful part of the world that. Now, mate, before we get into the conversation today, as a music lover, I was very intrigued to hear of your past as a professional musician playing the bass. Can you indulge me for just a minute and maybe drop some of the names that you played with back in the day?

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

 

 

[00:03:00]

Yeah, for sure. So, I think I should preface it by saying to all your listeners that I have a degree in German literature from a very small liberal arts college in Vermont, but I also minored in music. So, I studied classical music. I played in an orchestra, regional orchestra up there, and then rock bands in ski lodges in Vermont on the weekends, and then studied, in fact, with Jimmy Garrison, who was John Coltrane’s bass player, legendary sax player. Right? So, I played in his ensemble and took lessons from him. That was amazing.

 

 

 

 

 

[00:03:30]

But right after I graduated, I got a chance to audition for a band called McKendree Spring. They were kind of a country folk-rock band, started in the ’60s. They had done four albums by the time I joined them. I miraculously got the gig. Six months later, I was touring Europe, jammed with Jeff Beck in Berlin at the Columbiahalle. We toured England and did a record at The Manor, which was Richard Branson’s studios, like a converted 15th-century English manor house, and then went to London to mix it, and I ran into Jagger on the way to the men’s room.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

As you do.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

[00:04:00]

And he was doing Goats Head Soup downstairs, and I was doing my record upstairs. He’s pretty cool and he’s like, “Hello, I’m Mick.” And I’m like, “Yeah, I know who you are, man. I have all your records, for sure.” But he was very sweet. But I mean, so this band, I did three albums with this band, did one in England. We did one at Electric Ladyland, Jimi Hendrix’s studio on 8th Street in New York.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Yes, Jimi.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

 

 

[00:04:30]

That was pretty cool. And then a third record at Bearsville, which is in Woodstock, New York, where The Band and Bob Dylan, and later Todd Rundgren recorded. But in terms of cool gigs, after that, so after the band broke up and I moved to New York, I said, “Well, let me see if I can run with the big dogs and cut it in the city.” And I moved there and it was rough at first because I mean, it’s New York. So, I mean the top players on the planet live on that island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

[00:05:00]

But eventually, I got work and probably the most famous guy I played with was Robert Palmer. So, I got that gig through a drummer. And again, this is to all your listeners who are thinking about sort of the importance of networking, I can’t stress enough the [crosstalk 00:04:47] adage oft ascribed to showbiz, but true, certainly today, in every business. It’s not what you know, it’s who you know. So, I certainly say that to young, early-career workers and even to HR people as well. I mean, to executives, it’s like, find people that can help you drive your business model or expand your worldview.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Relationships do make the world go round, don’t they?

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

[00:05:30]

 

 

 

 

 

 

[00:06:00]

Well, that’s it for sure. So, here we are, opposite sides of the planet having a conversation because we are able to connect using technology and have a shared interest. So, Robert Palmer, so I did two tours with him. First one was like three months, started in LA, opening for Heart, and ended in London recording this live album at the Dominion Theatre. And the following summer, we did a bunch of festivals. We did eight countries in a month in Europe, started in Edinburgh and ended in Milan. And every other day it would be a new currency. It was before the Euro so that was always a challenge. If you want to tip the barman or the skycap, who’s got the local hearn? We used to call it. What’s the local money? I don’t know, I have krones. No, that was Sweden. That was two nights ago. I think it’s francs here. Aren’t we in France now? So, that was kind of the conversations.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

It seems a long way from your current business career, but there really is a link between your music career and how you fell into the IT world, isn’t there?

 

Christopher Bis…:

[00:06:30]

 

 

 

 

 

[00:07:00]

Yeah, for sure. I mean, the segue is, as I say before, in about 1985, I contend that music became data. Right? So, by that, I mean tools like the LinnDrum, which was like a digital drum machine, protocols like MIDI, the musical instrument digital interface which allowed you to control tambours from a single keyboard, the ability to sample and what they call sequence, right, which is basically composing, moving notes around if you wanted the groove to feel more relaxed, to slide the snare drum back a couple of clock ticks and make it feel more like a stadium rock groove instead of like a on top jazz groove. So, I bought a Mac Plus and I learned how to sequence. I bought a software program, Master Tracks Pro, and bought an eight-track recorder and learned how to stripe it with Synclavier so it would chase like the pictures so I could compose music and compose jingles and do it all myself.

 

 

 

[00:07:30]

I mean, it was fun, but it was also kind of sad because I used to do day tours, these beautiful studios in Midtown Manhattan, some which had been around since like the ’40s. The Edison Hotel had this beautiful, big, gorgeous orchestral room. We used to do all kinds of jingles in there. But after 1985 or so, one guy or gal could roll in a rack full of sampled sounds and control them all from a keyboard and put a lot of people out of work. So, it was kind of either join or get out was kind of the message.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

[00:08:00]

Yeah. It is the way of the world. Technology comes in, makes a change, and you have to change with it or step aside. So, it’s a good segue into what we’re here to talk about today which is emerging careers. So, in the fast-paced world that we currently live in, unlike when you’re perhaps playing bass for Chuck Berry, one of my favorite people that you’ve played with, obviously, things were a bit slower back then, and new and emerging career might have been 10 or 20 years away from being created. But these days, the types of careers that we’re talking about now might only be potentially three to five years away from being created. Do you agree?

 

Christopher Bis…:

[00:08:30]

 

 

 

 

 

[00:09:00]

Yeah, absolutely. I think it’s good. Whenever talking about sort of the future, I think it’s always good to talk about the past as well. Sort of past is prologue. Right? So, when I do these workshops at universities and I call them How to Succeed at Jobs That Don’t Exist Yet, I often preface it with a quote from Queen Elizabeth I in 1589, who said she refused to issue a patent for fear it would put her poor subjects out of work. And what she was talking about were automated, mechanized knitting machines. So, this is like 430-odd years ago. People were railing against technology taking people’s jobs or transforming how people work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

[00:09:30]

So, segue to 2020, I was in a conversation recently with a woman who’s a VP of logistics at DHL, right, big shipping company. And she said a lot of her sort of floor managers are now becoming robot implementation managers. They’re figuring out how to train robots, how to write software, put together business requirements that can then be translated to software that can be then uploaded into these robots to help with pack and pick or whatever, and shipping, and getting stuck in the right boxes in the right trucks. So, again, just a updated version of the kind of transformations been going on literally for hundreds of years

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Is technology driving all of the change, or are there other factors?

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

[00:10:00]

Well, I’d say technology is certainly the core of it, but I mean, there are other factors like social and cultural drivers. Right? The fact that the world is flat, that you can communicate with someone on the other side of the planet with a click of your thumb. The ability to sort of collaborate globally is, again, driven by technology, but people are comfortable working in new ways and interacting in new ways, and therefore, that sort of drives innovation and, in turn, implies interesting and new creative business models as well.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

 

[00:10:30]

And we talk about these new and creative business models, and then the careers that come along with them. We’re talking about careers that will be solving problems that we may not even have just yet. Is that how you sort of see it?

 

Christopher Bis…:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, the three sort of key data points that I like to cite when I’m, again, doing these workshops is 85% of the jobs that today’s learners are going to be doing haven’t been invented yet.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Yeah, wow.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

[00:11:00]

 

 

 

 

 

[00:11:30]

And they’re going to be using technology that doesn’t exist today. When I do this, I hold up my phone and my mobile phone and say, “This is going to look antiquated. Get ready for like a comment from your grandchild saying, ‘You mean you had to carry something around to talk to Grandma? That’s pretty lame. Must have been so inconvenient. I mean, you didn’t just like flick the chip and the holographic image appeared?'” And then they’re going to be using this technology to solve problems, to your point, that we don’t yet know are problem. The segue from that is this, I like to quote Tim O’Reilly, who’s a author and event planner and has a whole line of… We started out writing books on coding. Anyway, his contention is that as long as there problems to solve, there’ll be jobs.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

I like that.

 

Christopher Bis…:

I think that’s exactly right. Right?

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Yeah.

 

Christopher Bis…:

I mean, there’s always going to be some problems to solve and how we figure it out requires some kind of skill. And typically, again, the other part of this session is there’ll be current skills that are applicable and then the need to acquire or create new skills or create new knowledge, right, transferable skills versus net new skills.

 

[00:12:00]

Chris Lukianenk…:

 

I sort of think about the generations either side of me, my father and my son. And I think about my father. He pretty much worked for one employer his entire life. And I compare that to my 16-year-old son, and how there’s such rapid pace of change. I mean, how many jobs do you think he’s going to have in his career?

 

Christopher Bis…:

Well, so I can tell you.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Tell me then, great.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

[00:12:30]

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, right, a public sector agency with, in theory, no agenda. They’re just capturing the data. Here’s the data and the data has no agenda. They put out a report, probably a couple of years ago now, that says today’s learners, including your son, will have, get ready for this, 8 to 10 jobs by the time they’re 38.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Wow.

 

Christopher Bis…:

And that’s like an average number. Right? So, some may have more. Some may have less. But to your point, people working at one company for 30 years, that model is gone. I worked at IBM for 15 years, and some of the people I worked with had been there 30 years, 35 years.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

[00:13:00]

Yeah. So, what about these emerging careers that my son and others might be looking to get into? Have you got any thoughts around how they might be made up?

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

 

 

[00:13:30]

Yeah, so there lots of examples and I think the way to identify it, again, with a lack of modesty, I don’t think it’s necessarily rocket science. There ways to look at what I call signals, right, or triggers that indicate sort of where work, and jobs, and skill needs are going. Right? So, we talked about nanopharmacy. So, the three chemists who won the Nobel Prize a couple of years ago won it for developing nanomachines. Right? Machines that are 10 to the minus nine, like the 25th diameter of a human hair.

 

 

 

 

[00:14:00]

 

 

 

 

 

 

[00:14:30]

And just for reference, MIT, couple of years ago opened a brand new $400 million building which is basically nine floors of clean rooms focused on nanos, It’s MIT.nano. It’s the name of the building. And the career I cite around that is for one example is nanopharmacy. So, there are companies developing machines that operate at the nano level to deliver pharmacology, right, or drugs at the molecular or even atomic level to wounds or tumors, or wherever the medicine might be needed. One example is something called neural dust that these two doctors at UC Berkeley in California put together, and it’s a grain of rice-sized device that they implant wherever it’s needed. And it generates ultrasound to sort of help cure and stimulate a wound. But it also captures data, which is then sent back to like a receptor so they can analyze neurological characteristics. So, that’s sort of one example.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

 

 

 

[00:15:00]

It’s hard for someone like me who, I think of myself as the everyday man in those conversations. And I was trying to think yesterday about some of the guests that I’ve spoken with in the past, and maybe some of the areas that they’ve spoken about which might of qualify as being an area for one of these new careers. I was thinking of things like augmented reality, AI, and ethics, the coming together of those two areas, and maybe analytics and automation. Am I on the mark?

 

Christopher Bis…:

Yeah, no for sure. That’s exactly right. So, another example I cite is like a robot ethicist. That’s a job that’s appearing.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Robot ethicist.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

[00:15:30]

 

 

 

 

 

[00:16:00]

Right. So, they’re making robots now that are being deployed in lots of different situations, not just manufacturing sites, like building cars, whatever. But I mean, personal robots that help in like care homes or there robots that work in hospitals that do mundane tasks to free up nurses from having to, say, change bed linen or bring supplies to a doctor, or whatever. But the bottom line is if the robot drops something on your foot, who do you go to? What’s the legal commitment? Is it the robot? Well, it’s hard to sue a robot. Is it the caregiver? Is it the manufacturer of the robot? Is it the person who leased the robot? Where does that proverbial buck stop? Right? Questions around ethics and robots and even ethics and AI as well. So, as these new technologies, again, that’s an intersection that didn’t exist. I mean, 10 years ago, nobody needed to get a lawyer for a robot.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

 

 

[00:16:30]

No, they did not. I mean, we are sort of talking about the future and it’s sometimes it’s hard for people to be able to get themselves in that headspace. And I’ve got to say, it’s a bit that way with me as well. I was sort of thinking about this. If a job is yet to actually be imagined, how do you then educate the future worker to fulfill that role and that discipline? It’s a little bit of a chicken and egg scenario. You can’t teach someone how to do the role till it’s created. And how do you see that?

 

Christopher Bis…:

Yeah. Well, I think, again, my sort of general advice to, again, to younger workers and Gen Z learners, say, is to chase the maelstrom. Find the chaos. Go for the mayhem.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

I like that.

 

Christopher Bis…:

[00:17:00]

 

 

 

 

 

 

[00:17:30]

Go where they don’t know what it is yet. So, and then you can contribute. You can be creative. You can help invent or design it. And with any luck, you can be remunerated. Right? You can get paid to do something interesting. So, that’s kind of what I did in the web biz. I was in the jingle biz, writing music for television, and I saw this wacky thing come along called the internet. And I said, “That looks like it’s going to be interesting and probably have global socio-cultural business impact, and they may need music.” That was actually my initial segue was like, “Maybe I could write music for the web.” I said, “I can’t imagine the websites would be mute.” As it turns out they are, except for maybe Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network.

 

 

 

 

 

[00:18:00]

So, I taught myself to be a web producer by staying up late, surfing the web, looking at source code, taking classes, reading books about HTML, and left the jingle business and hung out a shingle as a web producer, and worked at a couple of seminal interactive agencies in New York. And then, much to my surprise, was hired by IBM into Corporate Internet Programs in 1998. And the reason was not because I was cute or smart or well dressed, it was because I had a skill that they needed. And to be honest, in 1998 there weren’t a lot of people who knew how to produce websites. So, they put together this sort of 12-person team. When I used to speak to clients on behalf of IBM, I’d say, “Yeah, I’ve been involved in the web since back when it was hip.”

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

[00:18:30]

So, do you think that’s what it’s all about? It’s all about developing your transferable skills and then combining that with on the job learning at the forefront of the technology in that industry, perhaps?

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

 

[00:19:00]

Yep, exactly. That’s absolutely right. So, again, another story at a meta-level, how I made that switch was, let’s take the situation where I’m producing a jingle. Right? So, I wrote some music for television. I actually sang and played bass on the first Kit Kat jingle (singing). So, in the studio, you have a certain players or actors. Right? You got a singer. You got a guitar player. You got a recording engineer. You’ve got a copyist. Maybe you got a keyboard player. And you got a client, and a budget, and a deliverable.

 

 

 

 

 

[00:19:30]

So, the way I made the switch from the jingle biz to the web biz at a meta-level was learning what those other actors were doing. Because I knew how to produce, how to run a team, how to get people to perform, but in the web biz, it was a copywriter, and a graphic designer, and a coder, a scripter, and probably an account person, but a client, and a budget, and deliverable. So, I learned enough about what each of those players were doing, what are the actors roles in the web biz, and became like an account manager, became a web producer.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

 

 

[00:20:00]

You seem very driven, and obviously, you’ve done a lot of self-education to make these career changes that you’ve been talking about. What about take it back to the everyday person? Who’s responsible for their education? Do you feel like it’s the educational bodies, the schools, and the universities, or is it the industry people, or is there a mish-mash in the middle there?

 

Christopher Bis…:

I think it’s the individual’s responsibility. And I would say the good news is there are myriad sources of information now, but the bad news is there are myriad sources of information now. So, the challenge is like sort of finding, and rationalizing, and doing triage on courses. Right?

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Yeah, yep.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

[00:20:30]

Whenever I talk about this, I love to cite this gentleman named David Blake who’s the CEO of a company called Degreed. And if your listeners aren’t familiar with that company, I encourage you to do a Google search, degreed.com. They have a tool, a cloud-based tool that connects corporate learning management systems with what they call publicly available learning assets.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Oh wow.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

[00:21:00]

So, they connect like a corporate LMS. They give learners, meaning employees, in this case, the ability to, say, pull in content that’s relevant to the learning pathway that they’re designing, leveraging something maybe on the LMS, but also maybe they find a book or a blog or a TEDx, TED Talk, or an article in an elite newspaper, or something on YouTube, and they can pull it in and then share it socially as well. But the net is this guy’s mantra, David Blake’s take is he wanted to jailbreak the degree. And his premise is the future doesn’t care how you became an expert.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Yep. I like that.

 

Christopher Bis…:

[00:21:30]

Right. So, you figure it. And they’ve done surveys as well. And they contend that the levy is broken. Learners nowadays, certainly in corporate settings, go much more to other sources than to, say, a manager for advice or guidance. So, the manager’s role then changes. Right? It’s like, well, how do you point employees to programs that help them learn?

 

 

 

 

[00:22:00]

 

 

 

 

 

[00:22:30]

Another great story. So, I was working with this CEO in Berlin. I was doing a workshop there with young CEOs and this guy runs a omni-channel retail company. I think they’ve got like 30 employees, maybe probably bigger now, but he doesn’t have any HR department, first of all, kicked them out. But the way he provides support is he speaks to new employees as part of their sort of orientation. What he does is he gives them $5,000 and says, “You figure it out. I don’t have time to hold your hand. I’m running a business here, I got to start up.” If you need to take a cooking class to feel more centered, or if you want to go to a conference, or take a week at the beach, or buy a bunch of books, or take some classes, he’s like, ” I hired you because you’re smart, and you’re motivated, and I expect you to figure it out, and I’ll see you next week or whenever.”

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

That’s pretty awesome. I like that.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

[00:23:00]

Isn’t that wild? Yeah, right. I mean, it’s extreme but it’s… He’s like 23 or something. For your listeners, that’s a model you might want to think about. Probably, it would take the right audience to be able to do that, the right employees, top talent, or whatever. But, that said, it represents sort of a cultural shift, I think, in how employees are educated and trained.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

No, absolutely. So, what about the market in general? I’m just not sure. Are we going to see a supply and demand skills gap in terms of what the industry needs and what the job market can give them? Or has this been going on since the beginning of the workforce, and it’s just sort of one gets a little bit ahead of the other, and then the other one catches up, and then leapfrogs, and goes a bit further on? How do you see that working?

 

[00:23:30]

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

 

 

 

[00:24:00]

 

Yeah, I mean, I think there’s always like a big job economy, certainly like inside any big company, like at IBM, there was a huge job economy, turnover, divisions getting shut down and other ones getting expanded. And from a employee perspective or workers’ perspective, I would say you need to always be aware of sort of what’s coming. Right? And again, the idea that you’re going to have 8 to 10 jobs, I contend that that’s a cool thing. I mean, I always try to tell students or early-career workers, you’re going to have these jobs because you can, not because you get fired or whatever. There’s lots of opportunity to do it.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Yeah, you have choice.

 

Christopher Bis…:

Yeah, exactly. You have a choice to do lots of interesting stuff. I mean, we’re at a seminal point where technology and global culture are intersecting in ways that they never did before. And what that represents is lots of really interesting opportunities to do cool stuff.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

[00:24:30]

Yeah, exciting times indeed. But then you throw something in like the pandemic into that mix of supply and demand and things go a little bit haywire. How’ve you seen that sort of change the playing field right now?

 

Christopher Bis…:

Yeah, no, that’s a great question. I think, as crazy as it is, and it is crazy. I don’t need to sort of demean the situation with the pandemic. I mean, it’s just mind-boggling. But that said, I think it was Winston Churchill who said, “Never let a good crisis go to waste.”

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

I’ve heard that before, yes.

 

Christopher Bis…:

[00:25:00]

 

 

 

[00:25:30]

Right. And what that translates to in terms of the workforce is an example I cite is Zoom. So, their profit went up 400% last quarter year over year. I mean, that’s crazy because people are doing meetings virtually. Right? So, as crazy as the pandemic is, it represents opportunity. So, I was just talking to somebody this morning about it. So, as soon as the vaccine, for example, or vaccines options are available, that’s going to be a logistical nightmare, manufacturing them, shipping them, distributing them, a logistical… a level of complexity that we’ve never ever seen.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

For sure, yeah.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

 

[00:26:00]

What I would say, people who are, for example, into data science, or AI, or machine learning, get on it. Get on the list because they’re going to need people who know how to do that stuff, how to get these vaccines, a billion bottles distributed around the planet. It’s not going to happen by itself. They’re going to need help. They need arms and legs. I mean, creating PPE. The medical telehealth biotech sector is burgeoning. Even things down to like Instacart, and Grubhub, and Uber Eats. I mean, new models are emerging, accelerated by the pandemic, for sure, by COVID-19.

 

 

[00:26:30]

 

 

 

 

 

[00:27:00]

But, again, there are things that are changing, things that are going away. I mean, I wouldn’t want to be in hospitality or even in retail right now, necessarily. Although that said, they’re certainly looking for creative solutions. So, if you, the listener, employee looking for their next opportunity have ideas about how to deal with the issues of stores closing, and new models for how you sell stuff and deliver stuff, or new models for hospitality, like people aren’t going anywhere. So, maybe, designing AR or VR vacations, that’s maybe like a burgeoning field. Like, build a pod where you sit in the pod and go to the Caribbean.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

As they say, life finds a way, doesn’t it?

 

Christopher Bis…:

Oh yeah. I mean, again, opportunity to do interesting creative stuff which translates to work, a job, to careers.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

So, in wrapping this all up, Christopher, what advice can you give the current workforce to take advantage of all of these opportunities so that they aren’t left on the bench for these future roles?

 

Christopher Bis…:

[00:27:30]

Yeah. So, I would say, certainly, always try to stay abreast of the latest technology stuff, right, no matter what field you’re in. And put up your antenna. Again, I have a course on LinkedIn Learning. This is my little sales plug at the end of our conversation.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Yes, we’ll link to that in the show notes.

 

Christopher Bis…:

 

 

[00:28:00]

Oh yeah? Okay. So, I did a course, a live-action course. I spent a week on a soundstage in Santa Barbara in January, kind of before everything went south. It’s called Future Proofing Your Data Science Career. But the core of it is what I call my Future Career Toolkit that uses voice, antenna, and mesh, these three tools that I developed based on how I navigated these eight careers. And you can go in and just fast forward. It’s about 20 minutes in, it’s this toolkit.

 

 

 

 

[00:28:30]

 

 

 

 

 

 

[00:29:00]

But it will give you actionable approaches and techniques for identifying your own sort of brand value voice. That’s the voice part. Second is antenna where you can track down where conversations are going on, based on the areas of interest you teased out with the voice exercise. And then mesh is building out your network of networks, building a sort of 3D data visualization tool, who you know and who you need to know, and get on their proverbial radar. Track down the actual people and companies and organizations that are doing stuff in fields that are interesting to you, and get in touch with them, and stay in touch with them, and monitor their work so that when an opportunity comes up on their team, or in their company, or in the company that a peer or a friend of theirs works at, they go, “Oh yeah, let’s get ahold of Chris. I saw the work that he did last week.” Or, “He sent me a PowerPoint Deck of a talk that he gave.” Or, “We had an interesting conversation a couple of months ago, and he was looking for his next opportunity.” So, back to sort of the networking conversation.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Yeah, networking.

 

Christopher Bis…:

Check out those who’s networking and building your brand and always be ready for the next thing. Look for what they don’t know what it is yet.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

[00:29:30]

Remain connected. Remain visible, and get on the front foot. Sounds like great advice. Christopher Bishop, thank you very much for your time today. It’s been great talking with you.

 

Christopher Bis…:

Well, thank you, Chris. I appreciate the opportunity.

 

Chris Lukianenk…:

Thanks mate. Thanks for joining me on the Intelligent Workplace podcast, brought to you by LiveTiles. If you have any feedback or want to suggest a guest for a future show, email podcast@livetiles.nyc. Thanks for listening. I’ll catch you-

 

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