The Intelligent Workplace

The Intelligent Workplace

Episode 37

Personal re-invention in times of crisis. With Brand Factory CEO, Doc Williams.

​Doc Williams
CEO
Brand Factory Inc.​​

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
“When written in Chinese, the word crisis is composed of two characters. One represents danger, and the other represents opportunity.”
John F Kennedy
 
For some, this quote sums up the situation the global economy finds itself in, due to Covid-19. The need to look for opportunities and soldier on, is a harsh reality in these tough times.
 
On this episode, Doc Williams, CEO of Brand Factory Inc, shares his insights on personal re-invention in times of crisis. Doc is no stranger to pivoting in his career. He has been a CTO and CIO, worked for ESPN, built a Ninja Warrior gym, and now teaches special needs children.
 
Never one to sit still, he has used the global pandemic to once again change direction. He is currently teaching people to build online businesses in his weekly “no code” webinars.
 
As you might expect, there is a lot of ground covered in this interview!
 
Episode Links
https://livetilesglobal.com/livesmiles/
https://brandfactoryinc.com/

Listen to the episode

Chris Lukianenko:

Hi, I’m Chris Lukianenko, and this is the Intelligent Workplace brought to you by LiveTiles, my chance to speak with the industry experts and explore the new ideas and technologies that are shaping and transforming the modern workplace.

                LiveSmiles is a LiveTiles initiative designed to create a global community working together to make wellness at work an intrinsic part of our lives. The LiveSmiles solution is technology built on top of Microsoft and LiveTiles platforms and is provided to every company globally at no cost. LiveSmiles is not a product that is for sale. It’s a movement to accelerate the discussion of wellness into an active and intrinsic part of work, and to ultimately drive happier, healthier people at work and home. It’s a combination of tech, expertise, advocacy and community involvement. LiveSmiles is driven and designed by its community. To find out more, click on the link in the show notes.

                On this podcast, I’m trying hard not to get bogged down in the harsh reality that COVID-19 has changed our lives forever. I’m trying to find the opportunities we are now presented with as a global community, and take a glass half full approach to the future. It’s easier said than done I do have to say. But I found a quote this week while I was researching for this podcast, it’s from the 35th president of the United States of America, John F. Kennedy. He said, “When written in Chinese, the word crisis is composed of two characters. One represents danger, and the other represents opportunity.” It really resonated with me and it made me think about the importance of looking for opportunities, soldiering on and trying new things during these tough times.

                I mention this because my guest for this episode is someone who is a firm believer in this mindset, having changed direction in his career many times. In fact, things change so rapidly with Doc Williams I’m not even sure how I should refer to him in this intro. Let’s go with CEO and founder of Brand Factory Inc, but I might just let him explain. Here to talk about the importance of reinvention in times of crisis, welcome to the Intelligent Workplace podcast Doc Williams.

Doc Williams:

Thank you so much for having me.

Chris Lukianenko:

It’s an absolute pleasure mate, and I don’t think we could be any further apart in terms of global location right now. Me down here in Tasmania and you in Washington.

Doc Williams:

Yeah. That’s pretty far. You can’t do much better than that.

Chris Lukianenko:

The power of the interwebs bring us together. Now look, man, I joked in the intro about not really knowing how to refer to you in terms of where you are in your career, because you always seem to have something new going on. Before we get into things, can we dive into your backstory a little bit? Because I find it’s a really interesting one.

Doc Williams:

It kind of depends where you want to start, but, I can start with the start of my first business, I guess? Maybe that would help-

Chris Lukianenko:

Yeah, cool.

Doc Williams:

… And kind of snake way through there. So my first business, I guess my first official one was when I opened a candy store, when I was about eight or nine years old. I think that’s pretty common with most entrepreneurs. So, started the candy store, and then when I was about 12 years old, I spent my money on buying a set of turntables and I … Yep. And then I became a wedding DJ, and that was basically how I made money from pretty much middle school all the way through college. I would always have my turntables and my amp and speakers, and I could always hustle and make money on the weekends if I needed it.

Chris Lukianenko:

Doc, can I let you in on a small secret, I also was a wedding DJ for a period.

Doc Williams:

Sure.

Chris Lukianenko:

Who would have thought.

Doc Williams:

You know what, no, we had that energy. It works. We can work together. That’s good to know. But you know what, I think that’s a big back … And now the more that I talk about it in interviews, I really feel being a wedding DJ, it prepares you for anything in life and you just always have to be spontaneous and be on. So, I mean, I did that in college. At the end of high school, I knew I didn’t want to necessarily go to a full university just because to tell you the truth, I was really bad at school, really bad. I was always running my businesses in school. I was a DJ, but I also opened my first eBay store in ninth grade. So I was selling a lot of things online and I was only in the computer class for web design, so I could be on my eBay store.

                So that took off and I was doing that. So then I went to school for massage therapy. The economy crashed. It was 2006, 2007 when the bubble hit. And then when I was getting out of massage therapy school, it was 2008, all these things. And then my parents were like, “You need to find something stable.” So I went to school for physical therapy assistant, I got my license and then I went out and had my own business, still doing massage therapy, but then I was working in a clinic as well.

Chris Lukianenko:

From then on didn’t you start up some kind of a park core [inaudible] sort of gym?

Doc Williams:

Yeah. When I was 23, I was just like, I didn’t want to stay in the clinic, or, I was I can never make as much money as I deserve. And I know that just seems wrong. I want to make my own. So I was, I’ll still see my patients in the clinic, which I love seeing my patients, but I was I’m going to open my own gym. So I opened a CrossFit gym and then I opened a park core gym. And it was in equestrian, an old, old horse racing track that they let us redo the entire track to be a park core gym, that was two levels to train for American Ninja Warrior. And then there was a CrossFit gym in the basement.

Chris Lukianenko:

That is cool. I think what I wanted to try and do there was just set the scene to let everybody know that’s listening to you is it’s pretty clear that you’ve got some great entrepreneurial skills basically. And look, I’ve always admired entrepreneurs for those skills that they bring to the table. But maybe more so for their guts and their determination to basically put it all on the line to chase their dreams. It’s not always an easy thing to do is it?

Doc Williams:

No. I think it’s a muscle. You just have to get used to feeling that way because it’s just tough. It’s tough. And on top of that, I think if anyone’s that’s married, I was newly married at the time. I can’t believe my wife stayed with me through all these things. It was also the buy in from her, but I always had a backup skill. If it really got worse, I could go back and do something and I could [crosstalk] money. But, it was definitely a cooperative that she let me do those things. And then I was willing to always go broke because I was like, “I’d rather be broke than working for people that I didn’t want to be around.” So yeah, it just made sense.

Chris Lukianenko:

Is it a common trait for entrepreneurs, that I’m willing to go broke?

Doc Williams:

I think so. And if you’re not, you will. You’ve just got to be willing to go broke-

Chris Lukianenko:

Because you will fail every now and then.

Doc Williams:

Yeah, definitely. I think so. That’s part of the arena. I think definitely before this last change with COVID, I think it was very trendy for people to be like, “I’m going to do this.” Very similar to any other bubble where everyone’s like, “It’s fine.” I really think it brings out the true entrepreneurs, things like this and how you can pivot and hustle. I just believe you’re going to have to be willing to sacrifice to do something [crosstalk]-

Chris Lukianenko:

Yeah, for sure. So one entrepreneur and you’re still working with entrepreneurs these days, assisting them with getting their ideas to become market ready propositions. What sort of assistance are they looking to get from you in your work with them?

Doc Williams:

Although on the surface they probably say marketing funnels technology, but really, I think it’s accountability and clarity in their business and that’s why they stick around.

Chris Lukianenko:

Okay. Have they got lots of different ideas just sort of rotating around in their head all the time, all the time and you just sort of lead to maybe slow things down and get them to focus?

Doc Williams:

Yeah. There’s a proven formula for what could work now. I’m not saying it’s going to work every time, but I’m trying to increase the likelihood of success by doing something based on a formula. And so if they’re thinking about different ideas, I that’s wonderful. But the reality is we have to stick to repeatable actions that are clear signs of growth or indicators of things that will happen. If not shiny object syndrome will kill the business and the CEO’s is running around like their head cut off and that’s not good for anyone.

Chris Lukianenko:

Is that formula what you refer to as the entrepreneur mindset?

Doc Williams:

Yeah. That definitely is. You know what? When I was younger, I would discount how much mindset was really a big part of the equation. I just always thought, everyone has that kind of thing. But yes, it starts with mindset and then it comes to the actions of actually going out there and doing repeatable actions like asking the right questions, actively listening, and then pivoting based on ones that want to be your target customer versus, hey, this is the trend that’s happening in the industry, let’s go and do that. TikTok’s big, let’s go do that. We got to go over there. It’s really dialing in. Where are we heading? Who are we serving? And that’s really easier said than done. So that’s why I’m there to reinforce that.

Chris Lukianenko:

I’m I right that you sort of … These paper that you’re working with, these entrepreneurs have sort of almost already got that entrepreneurial mindset going there. You just need to unlock it and refine it to help them reach their full potential?

Doc Williams:

Yeah. I would definitely go with that. Because I think there were people a lot more qualified and better than me that helped them with that mindset. And I’m there after they’ve established that, then let’s go and kick it off and scale it.

Chris Lukianenko:

I’ve always wondered. Is there a set of skills or character traits that you add together to make the ultimate entrepreneur? Like a bunch of superpowers or something?

Doc Williams:

That’s funny that you mentioned that. In my new course talking about selling with live streaming, I refer to entrepreneurs being like superheroes and understanding their origin stories, their superpowers, and understanding who they’re saving. So I definitely agree. I think it’s more similar to a superhero than most people.

Chris Lukianenko:

I’ve got to ask, do you have a favorite superhero?

Doc Williams:

Oh man. That’s tough. I’ve got two. All my life pretty much batman has been my favorite, and I just going to have to go with it. It’s might seem cliche. Then there’s a really obscure two mutants in X-Men. One named Forge, and the other one was a bad guy/antihero named Taskmaster and their abilities I always loved. And they never got enough luck. They were always on these side missions of the X factor, but yeah. Batman, my favorite and then those are my two favorite mutants.

Chris Lukianenko:

Do you think Batman perhaps embodies the entrepreneurial spirit?

Doc Williams:

I think. So I really do. When I view different entrepreneurs, I view them having utility bill and having different things for different occasions. And it’s finding that winning combination. I know one of my students were talking about it and he referenced it. It’s like having a set of how many Pokemons that you have. And I was like, “Yeah, work on that. That’s fine.” But yeah, I really think it’s a combination. I think it’s a combination of these unique things that you’ve built to get the job done. Batman’s of course one of the best example [crosstalk]-

Chris Lukianenko:

Perhaps Ironman could be another one as well.

Doc Williams:

Yeah. You know what, the problem with Ironman, I know that Bruce Wayne probably has just as much money. I feel maybe it’s just Ironman’s personality. I’m just like man, he’s got too much money. I don’t feel that way with Bruce Wayne. I’m like he definitely has just as much, I don’t know. Maybe that’s a problem.

Chris Lukianenko:

But we digress. Look, entrepreneurs and startups just seem to go hand in hand. I’m just wondering, are the majority of the entrepreneurs that you work with trying to get a startup off the ground?

Doc Williams:

They used to be because I used to be in three different startups.

Chris Lukianenko:

There you go. There’s another bit of your backstory.

Doc Williams:

Yeah. So I was in three different startups. I was a CTO twice. I was a CIO … Actually I was a CTO three times. One in a nonprofit, two in startups and then one CIO in a AI startup. And what I’ve discovered is personally, I like working with bootstrap startups. I do not like working with VC funded startups. This could just be my own experiences, but I just don’t appreciate being in those environments. I hate being in a company when they’re raising. And again, this is just my two cents on what happened in my companies. So I’m not saying this is indicative. But what I found is, I like working with bootstrap companies because it’s our money and it’s all [inaudible]. And I feel like VC, it gets so clouded.

                I’ve been with several CEOs that just get so in the mindset of raising that they lose sight of themselves and they’ve crashed and burned multiple companies. So afterwards, I said, you know what? I took a couple of years off in the startup world. I will consult startups, but they have to have a lot of different criteria before I consult with them. And then afterwards I pretty much stay closer to eCommerce businesses and ones that own 100% of the business and not startups.

Chris Lukianenko:

I was just sort of wondering, when you did work with startups, they’re almost born to fail, startups. I think it’s something 90% of startups fail. So, I’m wondering, is that why you got out of working with them in your business, because you’re just heading down this path to failure?

Doc Williams:

That’s an interesting question. I don’t mind failure, because I’ve failed a lot. I’m comfortable with that. What I cannot stand is when I was not in control of the startups, I was a C executive, whatever that means. But the issue is I found that … This might be controversial. CEO’s have to be dreamers. They have to be living that life. But it’s a thin line of being a dreamer and being a cult leader that I’ve found. And most startups start off really well, but a lot of CEOs lose themselves. And especially this obsession with trying to be another unicorn or doing something, it becomes a very dangerous path. And after seeing it several times, I kept, I just found myself, why am I spending so much time and energy trying to convince a company where I’m putting in only sweat equity? I know my reasoning is sound because that’s why they’re bringing me in as the CTO. I know what we need to do, but yet we’re being distracted by the whims of our CEO.

                I felt that I needed to take a break from that. I lik the energy of startups and I will help them bring in the right benchmarks and KPIs, key performance indicators if they want to succeed. But this whole, I want to be evaluated at this, this many seed rounds or this many series A, B, F whatever, I do not want to live my life like that anymore, so I consciously took myself out of that.

Chris Lukianenko:

Fair enough. You mentioned that you have failed in your own career. Do you think you’ve learned more from your failures than your successes?

Doc Williams:

Definitely. Definitely. Because in my successes, I always thought I was the best in what I did. The failure is very quickly realized that there were just so many better people, smarter people, talented people, and really it came down to positioning and the time and occasion that aligned with my successes. So, yeah. The failure has shaped who I am. And you know what, I’ll give you a little bit of a backstory, just a side point. I didn’t really start saying this story until recently. But, I have severe dyslexia and I was actually held back a grade in second grade because I couldn’t read. And, having that failure and having a way to figure out how to do normal things around people that people took for granted, that really shaped me at a young age. And I think that’s what really spurred me to do all these other things. So, yeah, failure for sure.

Chris Lukianenko:

That dyslexia has led you to another path of pivoting or re-invention in your racing career as well. You’re working with disabled children. Is that correct?

Doc Williams:

Yeah. Different ones with disabilities, such as, either, some dyslexia, learning disabilities, deaf and blind, children as well. But also teaching them how to use science and technology to still not only survive, but thrive in technology. So-

Chris Lukianenko:

It’s fantastic.

Doc Williams:

So, throughout the school years … Yeah. And helping them … There’s so many wonderful students, blind students that can become technicians for computers, teaching them how to use voice, to be customer service going that route and really using their abilities in a positive way to advance and to move ahead in these advancing technologies. So yeah, I’m very passionate about this.

Chris Lukianenko:

That must be so rewarding for you.

Doc Williams:

Yeah. Yeah. And that’s another thing. I know I need money to survive, but I don’t really get that excited with seeing how much money I make shareholders at the end of a quarter. I just don’t care. It adds it to their portfolio, but these kids, you’re allowing them to live, to live independently and to actually have a life and not be in fear of what’s going to be happening. And so I just find that education and teaching was my calling. And I enjoyed seeing children and just young adults, all people smiling once they learned a new skill. And I was you know what? I’m done with this. I don’t mind consulting, but I want to use my time and energy over here.

Chris Lukianenko:

I love it. I love it. I mentioned in the opener that we’re going to talk about the power of pivoting and re-invention, and I was wondering, are you keeping a running tally on how many times in your professional life you’ve seen the need to pivot or change direction or take on a new challenge?

Doc Williams:

That’s funny you ask. I stopped counting after about 49. I was in Boston, I was in a hostel and I was doing something and I was like, you know what? I’ve always talked about it anecdotally, how many things I’ve done, crime scene cleaning, my drone license and being a professional pilot for drones and going into that and working with writing for ESPN and doing all these sports things. So I got around 49 or something like that and I had a really good friend we’re only a year apart, but he was at 81 different jobs and he beat me and I was like, I don’t think I could … He’s the only one I know that has ever beaten me in the number of jobs. And he has the opposite problem. He’s so smart that he gets bored so quickly so he quits his job like it’s changing pants for him. He’s the only one in there. After I get around 49, I was like, no, I’m just going to write these down and that’s it. So I think it’s more than that, but that’s where I stopped.

Chris Lukianenko:

Do you borrow upon some of that entrepreneurial superpower when you’re pivoting? Because, times like this, when many of us are losing jobs struggling to make ends meet, and thinking about risking even more to take on any challenge seems very stressful.

Doc Williams:

That’s a good question. I do. But I always think that everyone has to take inventory. I know what I’m good at, I know what I’m bad at, but it’s really hard I feel, to have a clear distinction of taking inventory of what you can do with your eyes closed, or just make money and start pivoting and start doing these things. So I have maybe two or three things that I feel I’m proficient at. And no matter what I need to do, I can rely on those transferable skills. And that’s what I think most people can do now. Even in this pandemic, if you’re working at a job and you have to work that job now, or you have been laid off or doing something else, I really urge people to write down and have a written list of unfair advantage, skill points that you can take out and you can be better than anyone else in that arena. And doing that and mixing and matching the different industries you could be in, you’re going to find your calling. You’re going to find your way to be unique and standing out. And then you just double down and crush it that way.

Chris Lukianenko:

Makes me think, is there a playbook or maybe a set of rules that you follow for reinvention?

Doc Williams:

Not really. There’s a couple of books that I like reading and that kind of gives me inspiration. So I don’t know if there’s a playbook. I created a clarity course and that helps me kind of break down the feedback loops that I go through. But I really think people just need to find either a company or a person that inspires them that motivates them. And I really think action can be so much more of a catalyst than anything else. I’ve seen so many more brilliant people than me, but I think just having a way to snap yourself into action and just movement, just move forward. That pretty much makes you go farther than I would say more 80 … I mean, this is anecdotal, so don’t quote me, but I feel you’re going to pass over 80% of your competition if you’re just steady and just using your abilities and just not stopping and making incremental changes every day.

                I do have books. I can tell you my two favorite, three favorite books, but I think instant movement and just going … I can’t tell you how many times when I first got into podcasting, they were bigger podcasters than me, but I just outlasted them because I just kept doing it and they stopped. And I think that’s a big thing with business. If you can figure out a way to survive, you’re going to come out on top through those depressions, through those recessions. And that’s a quality I don’t think … It’s not sexy to talk about. Doesn’t sound great to just endure and be miserable and get through it. That’s not sexy.

Chris Lukianenko:

Not it’s not.

Doc Williams:

But that’s the reality of how they’re doing it.

Chris Lukianenko:

What about personal reinvention within people’s current careers. Should businesses consider embracing the idea, maybe at times these of allowing staff to reinvent themselves, or isn’t it maybe a little bit too risky that they just as you’re saying, just get through this part and then worry about that later?

Doc Williams:

I think it’s a mixture. I think you need to have an 80/20 rule, even in moments this. I think you need to have 80% of what’s working, let your employees take 20% experiment. And even if that’s in your own job, you say, I’m going to still perform. I’m going to be great at this job. But I mean, you can tell them or don’t tell them until you succeed. But use 20% of your time to experiment, work on these hypothesis, how you can help the company and come back with results. Don’t come back and, “I think we should do this.” No, ain’t nobody want to hear it. Nobody to hear that. What they want to hear is results and you saving time or making them more money or saving them more money. Have an attachment of what you’re going to do for the company, then show them results and tell them what you’ve learned and why you want to continue that. And I think that company, they would be foolish not to act on that, because if they don’t, more power to you, because you can go right around and build your own side hustle with the information and the experiment that you made without them.

                So, always succeed and try to help out the company. But if they don’t see the vision and you have something of value, go and do it, not all at once, I’m not saying quit your job. Do it in your spare time and go from there.

Chris Lukianenko:

I think back in the day we used to call it cross training and you’d take a year or whatever to go from one job to the new one. But I feel these days we are far more impatient and want it to just all happen now.

Doc Williams:

Yeah. Agreed, agreed. And it just is not going to happen. It’s not going to happen. I do pivot a lot. And so right now … I never liked to be in the same silo. I always to try to learn new things. So right now, I’m in a conference right now this week and it’s for a sports business classroom. So it’s teaching you how to become an NBA scout and how you get an involved in analytics at the NBA level. It’s interesting because number one, it’s only 90 candidates in there. You get to talk to GM. So the general managers of these big teams, Golden State Warriors, I was talking to him last night, the assistant GM. You get a lot of perspective. I think understanding how … If you’re getting out of line and learning from people from different industries, it’s just a different perspective. You learn so much, and I think if you can have more skills and understand people from different ways of life and other skills, you can create your own unique ability, take what you learn and then go from there.

                I love Bruce Lee. Bruce Lee, I mean, [inaudible] so the way the intercepting the fist, the philosophy basically I’m butchering it, but basically, take what’s useful, discard the rest. And I think that’s what people need to do right now in this type of economy. You have to quickly distill down what you’re going to do, how you’re going to show up. And this might seem very obvious, but working with different athletes and we’ve worked with professional athletes with millions of dollars, we’ve worked with influencers that used to make tens of thousands of dollars per month. When this thing hit with COVID, one of the most fundamental things were they were living beyond their means, and that’s what hit them so hard and that’s what made everything crumble. So I’m really about having a lean life, being able to live within your means. And that allows you to take the proper risks when you want to, but also you will not be as stressed if you are keeping your debt to a minimum throughout this.

Chris Lukianenko:

I mentioned in the opener that you’ve won so many heads over the years, this COVID crises has been going on near six months now, how have you seen the need to personally pivot during the crisis? Obviously you’re talking about the NBA GM track that you’re starting now, but have you been doing other things different to your regular business?

Doc Williams:

Yes. For years, I was doing marketing agency. We were rendering services, and during COVID, a lot of our clients went out of business or could no longer afford us. I can’t say anything bad and be like I can’t believe … Listen, everyone’s going through this, right? And so I had to understand what did I enjoy doing, how was I going to reinvent myself? And, I look back on my skills and I started live streaming for businesses and actually worked with a professional sports league back in 2015. It was a mixture of MMA and CrossFit anyway.

Chris Lukianenko:

Stop.

Doc Williams:

You can imagine that.

Chris Lukianenko:

How do you combine MMA and CrossFit? Is it like CrossFitters beating each other up, or what’s the story there?

Doc Williams:

I think we would’ve got more viewers that way. But basically, it would be they did weight classes. So the whole thing in CrossFit, some people would be like, this athlete it’s not comparable because he weighs more than that, blah, blah, blah. And so there was never always quote unquote a fair wight. So, Rush Club was you had different belts. So you had welterweight middleweight, heavyweight just like UFC. You would be in a ring, they would do everything, just like the spectating like an octagon, everything like that but they would work out head to head and they had an announcer just going crazy the whole time emceeing the thing.

                And, it was just a wild spectacle. So back in 2015, they wanted to live stream and Facebook, that was when their API was jacked up and it was so hard to live stream. And they wanted me to live stream at the beach, away from an ethernet connection. So I did it and that’s how I became the CTO and did that. So I had always learned how to do live streaming and I worked with a lot of gamers and streamers on Twitch.

                During COVID, I was like, you know what, I’m sick and tired of seeing everyone on LinkedIn saying we can make it, just keep going. I was like, that doesn’t mean anything. Generic terms like that is not teaching people how to be better and how to have a job. And so I was like, you know what, I’m going to live stream every night for 40 nights, and I’m just going to teach people how to build a business with one tool. One tech tool and how to start making your side hustle and make money.

                And so, for 40 nights I built three different businesses a night. So that was 120 businesses in 40 days. And when I was doing that, a bunch of people, different companies, started seeing what I was doing and different people I worked with. And they’re like “Man, that’s really interesting. Can you start showing my community?” Or, “Can you start showing our members of these groups?” From there, I started teaching and then I knew I was I’m going to do more consulting and I’m going to focus on bringing credentials and certifications to teach people, not just Photoshop or these things, but critical thinking to take your transferable skills and to be equipped in this modern day of marketing, to really understand what it means to be a brand developer and to go from tech to branding and all these things. Because, everyone’s wearing so many hats now. The gig economy, everyone wears hats. You’re not going to be one.

                So I was like I’m going to do this. And from streaming live streaming, I reinvented and started selling courses and consulting more and totally stopped rendering services for agencies, which I wanted to do years before. And again, I could still spend time teaching kids with disabilities. There’s a whole other issue about the school system and all of that going on right now. In the interim, I said, I’m going to do that on my channel and I’ll help as much as I can. So I pivoted in doing that.

Chris Lukianenko:

It’s all the hustle with you isn’t it? You’re finding an opportunity and you chase it down.

Doc Williams:

Yeah, yeah. Trying to, trying to.

Chris Lukianenko:

Trying to. It’s absolutely fascinating mate. I’m not sure how many hours of sleep you get a night, but I feel you’re a bit of an Energizer bunny that just never stops.

Doc Williams:

You know what, actually, I was looking at that … My wife found this old, whatever it’s called, second sleep and they were talking about all these people, I guess, through history. I actually don’t sleep that much, but I take a lot of naps. I take a lot of naps. If I do something that’s just too much energy, I don’t try to slug through the day. I just sleep for two or three hours. And then when I want to wake up, I just keep doing what I was doing. I genuinely like what I do. It’s a hobby so I just keep doing what I’m doing.

                Right now, you’re talking about Energizer. I just saw other people trying to, I don’t know, do other things. And I was like, you know what, I’m always trying to do or top another thing that I’m doing. And so I’m you know what, I’m going to live stream for a 100 days straight to show people how I build businesses. So this is day two of a 100-

Chris Lukianenko:

Oh wow.

Doc Williams:

… So I’m going to do this for a 100 days and-

Chris Lukianenko:

Fascinating.

Doc Williams:

… Start teaching people what they need to do to clear out and get ready for the end of the year and be successful.

Chris Lukianenko:

You’re exhausting me with the energy that you’re showing tonight. It’s fantastic. As I said during the opener, I wasn’t really sure where this was going to go with you because you have so many different elements to your experience. But I think overall, something I’m taking away from this is the fact that … In Australia, we say you have a crack. You really have a go at things. You put all your energy into it. And as I said, you chase down those opportunities.

Doc Williams:

Yeah, definitely. There is one thing, I’ve always said this. There’s an anime character, I don’t want to bring him into this, but there was different types of characters and some characters were really always talented and born with it. I was not talented. I have never been that talented person. But-

Chris Lukianenko:

But you work hard.

Doc Williams:

… I do. Yeah. I do try to work hard and that’s what I’m doing. And I’ve always tried to do that. So yeah, the opportunity, there’s tons of opportunities. People need pivoting. People need to know how to do it. So it’s let’s double down on this, let’s crush it. And that’s what I’m planning on doing the rest of 2020 into 2021.

Chris Lukianenko:

Best of luck with your plans to roll out till the end of 2020. It sounds really interesting. I really hope you do well with that. It seems like you do well with everything that you get involved in. And, thanks very much for having a bit of a chat about re-invention in times of crisis today.

Doc Williams:

Not a problem. Thank you so much for having me.

Chris Lukianenko:

Pleasure. Cheers.

                Thanks man. That was fantastic. You-

                (silence).

                Thanks for joining me on the Intelligent Workplace podcast brought to you by LiveTiles. If you have any feedback or want to suggest a guest for a future show, email podcast@livetiles.nyc. Thanks for listening. I’ll catch you-

 

More Episodes

Under the hood of a global supply chain.

Have you been giving your credit card a bit of a work out with onlie shopping sprees during Covid? Did you ever stop and think about the complex distribution network that supports your online habit? I must admit that I didn’t, until I met Ahmed Javed, the Head of Marketing & Communications for EFL, a global supply chain company.

While many global businesses have been reducing operations during Covid, companies such as EFL may have never been busier. EFL may not be a household name (yet), but chances are they have distributed something to your home in the past. They have 60 offices in 25 countries and have been operating for 37 years!

The EFL story is one of complexity made simple by innovation, and it delivers a fascinating insight into an industry that many take for granted.

View Episode