The Intelligent Workplace

The Intelligent Workplace

Episode 35

Under the hood of a global supply chain.

​Ahmed Javed
Head of Marketing & Communications
EFL Group​​

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Have you been giving your credit card a bit of a work out with online shopping sprees during Covid? Did you ever stop and think about the complex distribution network that supports your online habit? I must admit that I didn’t, until I met Ahmed Javed, Head of Marketing & Communications for EFL, a global supply chain company.
 
While many global businesses have been reducing operations during Covid, companies such as EFL may have never been busier. EFL may not be a household name (yet), but chances are they have distributed something to your home in the past. They have 60 offices in 25 countries and have been operating for 37 years!
 
The EFL story is one of complexity made simple by innovation, and it delivers a fascinating insight into an industry that many take for granted.
 
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Chris:

The Intelligent Workplace podcast is all about exploring stories from the business world. Stories that inspire, stories that help and stories like today, where you might learn something. My guest for today’s episode comes from a company that operates within a massive industry. One that many of us have been using of late for all of our online shopping we’ve been doing as we work from home. I am of course, talking about global logistics. It’s something that many of us take for granted. We don’t really think too much about it until our package arrives on our doorstep, or hopefully not too often when we’re chasing up a delivery.

Chris:

While many global businesses have been reducing operations, pivoting to find new opportunities or just treading water while waiting for this thing to blow over, you could argue that the global logistics industry may have just had to step things up a little bit. To take a deeper dive into the world of global logistics, I’ve invited Ahmed Javed, to the Intelligent Workplace. Ahmed is Head of Marketing and Comms for EFL, a global logistics company based in Sri Lanka. EFL, their name may not be familiar to you, but with over 37 years in the business and 60 owned offices in 25 countries, chances are EFL have been involved with distributing something to your home in the past. So without any further ado, let’s get into this and welcome to the Intelligent Workplace podcast, Ahmed Javed.

Ahmed Javed:

Thanks a lot, Chris. Thank you very much for the intro.

Chris:

Oh, the pleasure is all mine. I am really looking forward to learning a lot about the world of logistics with you today, Ahmed. But before we get into the detail, can you give me a bit of your elevator pitch for what EFL does because I think I would be offending you by just calling you a freight company, wouldn’t I?

Ahmed Javed:

No, it’s true. I mean, if you look at the logistics business now, everybody talks about supply chain solutions because earlier the freight forwarding traditionally is just, what you call referred to as a port-to-port moment and traditionally that’s what freight forwarding companies do. When we talk about logistics companies, then you know you add another factor which is distribution, warehousing. And then we talk about supply chain companies, you’re talking about the entire gamut of everything that moves from your door all the way, right down to the consumer in store.

Ahmed Javed:

So I mean, there’s different parts of the logistics, supply chain and all that really combined now to become this massive piece. And we really try really hard now. I mean, traditionally the business did start as a freight forwarding company almost 40 years ago, but now we’re also moving towards being a fully supply chain company bringing in technology. I think I would say building the blocks so that you have visibility to your entire supply chain so that one company is managing everything because let’s face it global trade is all over the world, right? And it’s not physically possible sometimes to have a presence in every country. So in that case, you have to then work with partners. You have to work with companies who can also support you.

Ahmed Javed:

And that’s what we’ve essentially done. We have our own network of 60+ offices across the 25 countries that you’ve mentioned. But then we also have a global network of agents and partners who we work with. So, I mean, theme is that if you work with us in one country, we guarantee to give you that same level of service and consistent reliability across the globe. And like you said, supply chains are really, really… Well, now, I mean, we were a very small company that started in Sri Lanka and primarily we were just moving product from sourcing markets to the warehouses of the brands in the West. Today, you see demand shifting, you see a lot of consumer demand in Asia, you see a lot of it in the Middle East. So I mean, the traditional model has moved from, you were sourcing from one market and you was just moving in one direction. Today it’s all over.

Chris:

It’s an absolutely massive operation. And I just want to know, do you sometimes feel like we, and by we, I mean the end consumer, we don’t appreciate the size and the complexity of your world enough, do we?

Ahmed Javed:

No, I think, see, it’s funny because I think if you look in the e-commerce model, there is definitely a lot more, I would say interaction with the end consumer now. But again, with e-commerce there are a few challenges because it’s not always in bulk, right? The heavy, bulky stuff has to be moved by somebody. And then the last mile as we call it, which is really, your door to door. That’s traditionally tied by another company. So I think we are a lot more in touch. And if you look at some of the larger businesses, which are e-commerce base, they actually link direct to the consumer and the supply chain.

Ahmed Javed:

So if you go to a global platform, which has multiple brands, they have a closer connection. And as a result of that in a indirect relationship, we also have a closer connection. And I think, yeah, there is. And I think everybody has, the pandemic really has created the awareness I would think around supply chain and logistics, because while everybody’s been in lockdown, we’re still needed to get certain things whether it’s to our doorstep or across the world.

Chris:

Yeah. I mean, I feel like that maybe we only want to know about you when something goes wrong, because there’s this expectation that this complex combination of I’ve got vendors, systems, vehicles, warehouses, custom departments and local delivery operators, and we just expect it’s going to work and get us our deliveries on time. I just wonder, should we instead be celebrating your industry for what you do best, which is make a very, very complex system so simple for us to use?

Ahmed Javed:

Well, I mean, agreed. I mean, I would love to have that. I would love to have that feeling across the world. I think it’s also important to understand that as existing companies, we traditionally, I mean, we don’t own the product, right, and we don’t even own more or less the modes of transport that the product is moved on. But what we essentially control is the relationship between the supplier and the buyer. And I think in that sense, it’s a very crucial relationship because you need that element to work and you need that element to work very well for there to be that successful dependency on the supply chain. Because you see, that’s the thing, one of the biggest things in logistics is that it’s very cumbersome, right? It’s very technical or it’s considered a hassle, right? And you need somebody to basically take on that responsibility to do it for you and give you the confidence that, look, take a back seat, not to worry. We’ll make sure you get your product on time when you need it.

Chris:

You’re a bit like the duck on top of the water, you just you’re simplifying the complex. You’re looking all cool, calm and collected while you’re doing all the little one percenters for your consumers, your customers, your partners, that sort of thing.

Ahmed Javed:

No, it is. It’s actually been something that’s part of the company DNA as well, because I mean, our founder talks about treating every customer as a friend. And you take your problems away from your friend. I mean, it is. Today of course, it’s not directly like that, but if you really, really try to oversimplify, you’re trying to help somebody out to just basically move something from one part of the world to the other. Of course, you know you have so many vendors, so many suppliers, so many airlines, so many stores, but in the end for us, it’s that one package. So we treated it as, look, this has to be moved from A, it has to be moved to B, it has to be moved in this amount of time, and it has to be moved in this way. And then, so I think if everybody focuses on what they do best within the supply chain, the relationship works.

Chris:

Yep. And I’m assuming technology plays a huge part in your operations. And it’s probably something that the average person such as myself can’t really understand. So I was wondering if you could maybe give us an idea of the scale of the systems that you work with.

Ahmed Javed:

No. So I think one of the things is that we have to understand why the physical activities don’t change, right? You still have to move things on a plane or ship or train, right?

Chris:

Yes.

Ahmed Javed:

Everything else around it is managed through technology, right? We’re talking about a commodity that’s constantly moving. And in that sense, communication and visibility are the key aspects that we have to focus on, and that’s only done through technology. And for us, the way we look at technology is externally for the customers and internally for us managing the supply chain. So just to get into the internal stuff first, I mean, we have an enterprise resource planning software that we use that helps us manage all our internal shipments. And we are also creating a level of visibility directly through that for our customers.

Ahmed Javed:

But also then, it’s about the communication because you have so many different people. I mean, when you talk about shipment, even between our own offices, there’s a lot of communication that goes back and forth and that’s all because of technology. Again, traditionally, we are dependent on email and all that, but that is changing because we’re introducing a lot of communication tools where information can be pushed to clients as opposed to them requesting for information or requesting for updates. So it’s really about creating platforms or creating a system where depending on where the product is and different events that are taking place within the supply chain, you’re creating that aspect of visibility.

Ahmed Javed:

And especially with overseas companies, right? It’s all about keeping tabs on the different people and managing your shipment. And then we talk about the complexities, like you mentioned, the global trade, documentation, protocols, transparency, security, compliances. So you have to really package that entire thing together and you have to identify. You also you have to sort of flag the key important elements, say, look, these are the key elements that the customer needs to be aware of, these the ones that we need to manage internally. And then it’s about using technology to create that visibility.

Chris:

Yes. Yeah. You do rely on it so heavily because you’ve got these packages just out and about in the world that you can’t actually see and touch. So the technology is your eyes and ears, I suppose. And heaven forbid that it would ever happen to your company, but in Australia recently there was a cyber attack that pretty much ground a logistics business to a halt. I’d imagine that would be absolutely devastating. What kind of contingencies and workarounds do you have to have in place to deal with something like that?

Ahmed Javed:

No, it’s a valid point, because I think it’s about 18 months ago that we really identified this. So what we decided was that when we started going on the technology route, one of the key concerns that we addressed was cyber security and online security because security of information. We also have this thing where we’re connecting to supply chains of other clients. I mean, so we call this EDI integrations. And in that, what we do is we have this middleware that we created and we’re connecting with the information from our customers and then using that to feed the supply chain and give them the visibility.

Ahmed Javed:

So the thing is, I mean, in any company we have what you call the DMCs, the BCPs, but also in the other sense, we also have a few other systems that are primarily dependent on a few key users and for them we’ve given them different levels of access and different levels of connectivity. Look, one thing is in supply chains, you have to always plan for disruptions, right? And it could be, it’s not just technology-related. We talk about weather that’s going to impact us. We talk about political instability or any escalating situations in that sense that could impact us.

Ahmed Javed:

And so we’ve kind of identified that, look, these are the number of external forces that can impact us. And how do we do it? Like we’ve had issues where people haven’t been able to physically get into the office because of floods and things like that. But then we still make sure that, look, we have, so I mean, one, we have a strong backbone for our technology, but we also have connectivity and systems because we’re linked to the customers that give us that kind of visibility to manage and plan things beforehand. So I think that’s been very, very helpful. I think it helps to have a team that can give you the on-ground knowledge and then be able to feed it into systems, which can then populate that to the customer.

Chris:

Absolutely. Supply chains are often seen as a    service to so many businesses, as we’ve already mentioned, but in doing my research, I fell across a concept that was completely foreign to me as a guy in his 40s who doesn’t really care for fashion. And that was this idea of fast fashion, which I know you’re involved in. It really intrigued me, but I bet there are many people who are listening who wonder, what am I on about, what is fast fashion? And I was wondering if you might be able to give us a bit of an insight into how this whole thing works.

Ahmed Javed:

Yeah, sure. I mean, fast fashion is, I mean, if you’re talking about anybody in the fashion industry, they have come across the concept of fast fashion. And to be very honest, Zara has pioneered this concept. I mean, they started on this journey about four or five years ago and really, okay. So their initial, just to give you some background, their initial concept was about looking at, merging the information that they were getting from the customers and from their stores on ground, taking that information through their sales systems, merging that with fashion trends, global seasonal things, fashion shows, things like that. And then using the information and input that they had from their store managers and being able to turn products every 10 days.

Ahmed Javed:

So initially it was growth through diversification with multiple integration. So it was about adapting designs, manufacturer’s distribution, renting clothing within two weeks of the original design first appearing, right? Where this is in stark contrast to the average industry where it takes two to three months. So what you’re talking about is design to distribution in less than 14 days.

Chris:

Wow. That’s insane.

Ahmed Javed:

And then the emphasis comes on the supply chain. So look, we’re turning this around in terms of our product, then look, if we’ve struck down, let’s say manufacturing time by two-thirds, how soon can you in terms of supply chain partner, can you also give us that, can you maintain that same momentum? So it’s kind of pushed us to also then explore a lot of different things. And over the last couple of years, I think we’ve successfully done a few things in that range. So we have weekly freighters that consolidate cargo from about seven different countries and going to the distribution warehouses of the West. That’s one of the things that we do.

Ahmed Javed:

And then we’ve also worked out a few cross-border solution. So I think if you look at, especially when you talk about limited infrastructure markets where things are not streamlined, where it’s not very clear, there’s multiple documentation and things like that. You have to have contingencies. One of the examples that I can share with you is we did a cross-border solution across India and Bangladesh. What we found is that we had to move cargo from India and generally in North India, you do get a lot of space issues because during the peak season, there’s always, it’s a difficulty in trying to secure a space. Now in the same sense when we try and when you look at neighboring market like Bangladesh around that time, because we have an office there as well, we were able to identify that there was a bit of a gap.

Ahmed Javed:

So what we thought was, how can we use? I mean, working with different governments, working with everyone, we came up with the cross-border solution where we were able to track the initial part of the journey, right, and then airlift it straight from Bangladesh. And we did this successfully for a few European clients. We also did the same movement by ocean and it’s worked. So I think the main thing is logistic companies have to be very, very agile, right? They have to think on their feet, you have to develop solutions depending on the requirements of your buyers. And then sometimes, you have things like the natural disaster that impacts you and you know a port is completely under, or you’re not able to access the airport because of rains and things like that. How do you at that point react? What’s your contingency because product still has to move?

Ahmed Javed:

And I think that’s really, because I think one thing is, like I said, experience in limited infrastructure markets where things are not streamlined, where things are taking, they take their own pace. That’s really helped us take this… I guess it’s an edge we have because we’re used to this, this is familiar territory to us. We’re not surprised because we hear that there’s going to be a disruption. And another thing is, I mean, using technology, we’ve also created a platform where we’re creating visibility to this sort of disruptions and things. I mean, one of the things that we always speak to our customers about is that they would like to know what’s going on in logistics. It’s like there’s this whole gray area. There’s this whole uncertainty. And again, that-

Chris:

So once the package leaves us it’s out of sight out of mind kind of thing.

Ahmed Javed:

… Exactly. Once it leaves their supplier, right, you’re talking something that’s leaving some part of Asia and that has to get into some part of the West. And you have 32 days or 36 days in-between, and it creates this uncertainty on where’s my cargo, or what’s going on. And then you’d hear about things, weather is being an impact or you hear about things in neighboring countries. So again, we use technology to create a platform.

Chris:

So would you say that innovation is a really big part of your core business?

Ahmed Javed:

It is. It is.

Chris:

You focus on it. Yep.

Ahmed Javed:

Yes. So we’ve again, for us, innovation has been sort of started there’s been different levels of innovation. Initially, it was about how we could move the cargo and different ways that we could move the cargo. So I’m telling you when the company first started, one of the first innovations we did was something called garment on hangers, where you essentially load the garments in a way where they can be taken off the ship or taken off the truck and-

Chris:

Straight onto the rack sort of thing.

Ahmed Javed:

… straight onto the rack sort of a thing, right? But now the innovation is about creating visibility. What more can you do? How can you create this thing? And we talk about one of the things that we’re working on is a centralized control tower to give you that visibility, right, where it doesn’t matter. Look, generally the brands how they look at I mean random customers, for our customers, how they look at their product is depending on the different SKUs. Now, when you’re moving their product for us, we’re looking at the SKU in a consolidated way, but the brand’s still expecting information and things to come in that system.

Ahmed Javed:

So then you have to create technology that sort of connects with their systems, integrates with our system and then also integrates with whether it’s an airline or shipping line and their system. So it’s really about identifying what those key steps are and then having innovation that’s part of that. And that’s where I also mentioned the other market report that we have done is also one of those platforms and things that we have created.

Chris:

All about connectivity, it sounds like. Let’s switch over and talk about supply chains pre and post-COVID. I’m just wondering has the pandemic actually changed how you operate or has it just made you busier because of the increasing consumer purchasing trends? I actually read something this week that said there was an expectation of online purchases increasing by 160% across this period. That is massive.

Ahmed Javed:

No, it is because I think you’re talking about… See, the pandemic has created, I would think a lot of uncertainty and uneasiness, right. And people do tend to spend more and more time online and trying to, either it’s trying to grab information or doing their research or even for purchasing. So what you also see is a lot of time is being spent now with people browsing the websites with shopping websites and things like that. So I think one of the biggest changes we’ve seen is we’re now serving the wants of people rather than the needs because at one point, we’re talking about sending just the latest fashion trends. Today, you’re talking about PPEs and medical equipment, right. And what’s it done is really it’s about, I think one of the things that you will see directly out of this pandemic is customers building a very resilient supply chain, right, where they look at different options for supply chain.

Ahmed Javed:

So, I mean, just from an industry perspective, we talk about having better elementary and capacity buffers, maybe diversifying your manufacturing network, we talk about multi-sourcing and things like that. And one of the other things that we’re seeing very common now is something called near-shoring where company is using the, to reduce the geography and the dependency on that global networks, they’re actually trying to source for markers that are regional or local. So you will see that, you will see that the traditional supply chain mindset has changed.

Ahmed Javed:

And I think one of the things that we see that will happen is it will drive to a demand-driven supply chain, what we refer to as a DDSC, where in comparison to a traditional supply chain, you’re talking about the pool concept. So the idea is a company basically sources from, I mean, you move away from focusing on your plant level-based production planning and adopting more of a consumer demand-driven approach, because then it’s not about just storing stock and keeping inventory. It’s more about being able to pull that inventory as and when you need it.

Ahmed Javed:

So I think it will also create, I mean, one of the things that will probably lead to are the creation of a few logistic hubs, because you talk about consolidating cargo and keeping it in a place, but also you talk about then not having to take on the responsibility of holding supply and holding stock because let’s face it. Even now, companies are challenged in trying to bring all the staff on board with social distancing messages and get their product out. So it’s really, it’s created another layer of, I would say, well, another layer of compliance more or less.

Chris:

Yeah, the world has changed.

Ahmed Javed:

The world has changed. And it’s really important is the people in the supply chain are the ones who are dealing directly with customers. So you are coming to interactions with the everyday consumer and the average consumer. So it’s even more important for you to do that. And I think-

Chris:

So assume that with all of this going on, you’d been partnership with a number of airline operations, and I’m just wondering how you’ve handled that interaction. I mean, in Australia, we’ve seen industry crippled with international and internal borders being closed down for consumer travel, but cargo flights need to keep operating. I’m just wondering what it’s been like in your experience with your airline partners navigating these treacherous waters, if you like.

Ahmed Javed:

No. So I think it’s been a very, very busy period, definitely because we’ve had to work with multiple partners depending on the requirement. And I think one of the things that you see is the trend first started in China, right? And we did see that the large number of cases came in right after the Chinese New Year. So what that meant was that the moment that things started opening up, it was the Chinese airports that were really busy, or at least I would say Southeast Asia. But now what you see is because things have settled down a bit, it’s the other neighboring markets, which are also sort of capitalizing on this. And so we’re seeing a lot of movement from other offices. And I think really even the airline partners, I think they should be given due credit because some of them may even converted commercial airlines to carry cargo. Right. You’ve seen actually using different pictures, it’s across social media where you see the inside belly of the plane where-

Chris:

Yeah. Where the seats have got cargo on top of the seats and stuff.

Ahmed Javed:

… Exactly. Because there is such a demand for PPEs, there is such a demand for medical equipment. And like we’re seeing now with the second wave, it doesn’t seem to be coming to an end anytime soon. So now I think now countries also want to go into this state of preparedness where they don’t want to be underprepared. So at one point, I guess it was a very reactive thing where you were really just trying to meet the demands that were coming in for them to service the requirement that was on ground at the point. But now I think probably what will happen is companies, consumers, countries would probably be a lot more proactive and what we call is forward purchasing. They’ll probably do some forward purchasing to be able to hold on to stock and then be able to, so that they can go through this time and not have to wait again for product to arrive from some other part of the world.

Chris:

No, fair enough. Now look, the world as we know, the world’s in a pretty precarious position right now. Everyone’s on edge, why do it, their future. And your business has been around for a long time and obviously for a successful business to be around that long, relationships are what drives business. But I’m wondering in these unprecedented times where you’ve had to go through a period of building trust all the way through in your business, have you then had to reprove yourself in the new world, even though you’ve got this great history of relationships and experience?

Ahmed Javed:

No, you have to. I think it’s just, it’s part of the new normal, right? Because just like anything else, it makes you question everything, right. And again, yes, we have amazing relationships, but also I think in the last couple of years, because we’ve really tried to get across the message that, look, this is our DNA that you know we talk about. So our purpose as a company is about building great businesses, right? And that doesn’t just doesn’t stop with just the consumers or the customers. It also talks about helping the airlines grow. It also talks about having the shipping lines grow. So I think it has, and I think we’ve got a lot more closer I would think. I think that we have got a lot more closer because you’re working with people a lot more often.

Ahmed Javed:

I mean, I know for a fact that across with it, even at home and in families, you’re seeing a lot more connectivity and communication because people have been forced due to the pandemic. And I also think in the same sense on a business side, that kind of intimacy between your supplier and yourself has increased because everybody’s going through this. I mean, this is not a question of this is being experienced in your market. So you are finding common ground and you are finding a common element to connect to. And if you already have existing relationship, I just think that that builds that connection much closer.

Chris:

Yeah, no, I tend to agree, mate. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. We’re hearing a lot of devastating stories about businesses during this period. There are either struggling, or maybe they’re going under as a result of the pandemic, but in these times it also breeds innovation and companies are pivoting and finding new ways to do business. I’m just wondering has this disruption allowed your business some time to maybe take a breath and look at opportunities or is it just being full tilt, trying to look after those increases in online purchases?

Ahmed Javed:

So I think one of the things that is very important is while we see this change and why we talk about innovation, it’s also important for supply chain companies to be proactive and to sort of lead the conversation. We know how the traditional model works, where the brands and the customers come to us with a requirement, right. And it’s really up to us to sort of talk to them and give them different options. I mentioned to you near-shoring, multi-sourcing and demand in the supply chain. So we need to really create an ecosystem where we can give that flexibility to the brand, right?

Ahmed Javed:

Whether we talk about connectivity across the entire supply chain using different platforms and really taking on the ownership of the entire logistics and being able to try and connect that with how the customer and consumer is operating. Because essentially, I mean, like I mentioned, we have a demand in the supply chain, the consumer, the end consumer is the one who’s really holding the conversation or he’s driving the conversation. Then it comes back down to the supply chain company. Look, what are the different options that we can offer to our clients?

Ahmed Javed:

And most I can tell you now, every customer and most consumers have realized that the traditional sense of operating is now on the trend, right? And then, because they’re looking at different options, we need to use this opportunity to start to talk to them and create awareness on different options that they have. I mean, you’re not still talking about sourcing product from one market and supplying to one market, right. So I think there’s a lot of conversation and I think it’s a positive thing because it’s giving even companies the flexibility to be able to manage their supply chain a lot better.

Ahmed Javed:

And I think it’s a positive. I think it’s very, very good sign because it also gives more room for better collaboration between companies, between suppliers and that same sense the technology will play a huge part because that’s going to be the way that everybody’s going to connect and sort of work together and collaborate better.

Chris:

Absolutely. Look someone say, if you can get through these pandemic and still be a successful business, you can get through anything I think. So what excites you about the future of your company within the supply chain industry?

Ahmed Javed:

I think for me, it’s our roadmap. I mean, in terms of the digital roadmap that we have laid out, as I mentioned to you, one of the things that we want to really focus on is having a centralized control tower for visibility, being able to work with any partner in any part of the world and still being able to give that level of visibility to our clients. But again, from my perspective, and it’s about from a brand perspective, we want to be in the top 20 logistic companies in the world. And also it’s really, my focus is on trying to enhance the interactions between the brand and the customer.

Ahmed Javed:

I mean, I really feel that there’s a huge opportunity for us to do that much better and being a subcontinent company, I think there’s a very few examples that you can share a subcontinent company that’s become a global logistics business, but I think we’ve sort of set the right stage for that. And it’s really exciting because as we grow the different products that we move have changed. We used to be primarily fashion-focused. We’re not talking about driving more tech products and a result of the pandemic, more healthcare and pharmaceutical-related products, and then be shifting the focus away from just being a traditional freight forwarding company to being a global supply chain solutions company.

Chris:

Exciting times, busy times, and hopefully successful times for you and your business, Ahmed. Look, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed hearing your stories today and learning more about the logistics and global supply chain industries. It’s fascinating stuff. And I am one of those consumers who only really knows about you when I receive my package or don’t receive my package. It has been great to understand some of the inner workings of the business that you’re operating with. So I thank you very much for your time today, Ahmed. It’s been absolutely fantastic.

Ahmed Javed:

Thank you, Chris. Lovely, lovely talking to you. And it’s great because I loved hearing the perspective of somebody who doesn’t really know the workings of the supply chain, but still has a dependency on it. And I think that’s a great thing because you know, one of the things that we talk about is we talk about the very visible heroes that we have during the pandemic, which is the healthcare workers and all of that. But then there’s also the concept of the invisible heroes, everybody in supply chain, right?

Chris:

Yeah. For sure.

Ahmed Javed:

So I think it’s good. I mean, like one of the things you mentioned was creating the awareness for the industry as a whole. So I appreciate you doing that for us.

Chris:

Absolute pleasure, Ahmed. It’s been absolutely wonderful. Thanks for joining me today.

Ahmed Javed:

Thank you, Chris. Thanks a lot. Take care.

Chris:

Thanks mate.

 

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